This is a Poster I designed for my continuing education class at SVA.  I think green roofs are a pretty amazing way to help the environment while transforming the city in a beautiful way. So I was thrilled to have an excuse to make this. This is meant to be a large 20 by 30 inch poster, but I plan on making some alternate versions that are more web friendly interms or readability. I would be doing that with the hope that this actually gains some traffic to spread awareness about green roofing as a possibility. 
Here’s a link to a larger size. http://lmosher.deviantart.com/art/Green-Roofing-467037384

This is a Poster I designed for my continuing education class at SVA.  I think green roofs are a pretty amazing way to help the environment while transforming the city in a beautiful way. So I was thrilled to have an excuse to make this. This is meant to be a large 20 by 30 inch poster, but I plan on making some alternate versions that are more web friendly interms or readability. I would be doing that with the hope that this actually gains some traffic to spread awareness about green roofing as a possibility. 

Here’s a link to a larger size. http://lmosher.deviantart.com/art/Green-Roofing-467037384

brevoorthistoryofcomics:


X-Men #137 - September, 1980 More has probably been said and written about X-MEN #137 than virtually any other comic book of the period. And every word of it is true. More than any other single issue, this story made X-MEN the unrelenting sales juggernaut it continues to be to this day. It’s never been topped.  So what can I add to the reams of discussion? Well, I can tell you that I bought my copy in a local card store, which had become my primary source of new comics in the last year or so, since it was closer to my house than the 7-11, and got its books in better shape. I can tell you that I bought my copy along with my friend Israel Litwack, whom I’d turned onto X-Men just two months earlier. I can tell you that I read it in the far left corner of the couch in my family’s living room in the afternoon. And I can tell you that it was every bit as good is it’s reputed to be.  I don’t know if the X-Men fans of today can really appreciate this story, since so much that’s come since has in one way or another been because of it. (Not to mention the fact that this story was done back when the X-Men were still super heroes, as opposed to whatever the heck they are today.) The death of Jean Grey completely rewrote the rules about what could potentially happen in any Marvel Comic. And yes, I think it was a terrible mistake to have brought her back—but that’s water well under the bridge at this point.

brevoorthistoryofcomics:

X-Men #137 - September, 1980

More has probably been said and written about X-MEN #137 than virtually any other comic book of the period. And every word of it is true. More than any other single issue, this story made X-MEN the unrelenting sales juggernaut it continues to be to this day. It’s never been topped.

So what can I add to the reams of discussion? Well, I can tell you that I bought my copy in a local card store, which had become my primary source of new comics in the last year or so, since it was closer to my house than the 7-11, and got its books in better shape. I can tell you that I bought my copy along with my friend Israel Litwack, whom I’d turned onto X-Men just two months earlier. I can tell you that I read it in the far left corner of the couch in my family’s living room in the afternoon. And I can tell you that it was every bit as good is it’s reputed to be.

I don’t know if the X-Men fans of today can really appreciate this story, since so much that’s come since has in one way or another been because of it. (Not to mention the fact that this story was done back when the X-Men were still super heroes, as opposed to whatever the heck they are today.) The death of Jean Grey completely rewrote the rules about what could potentially happen in any Marvel Comic. And yes, I think it was a terrible mistake to have brought her back—but that’s water well under the bridge at this point.

Here’s a logo with icon designs, I recently made for a client. The client wanted something very modern and iconic.
    He provided me with some sketches that gave me a ballpark for what he wanted for the “i” and the “k.” He wanted the design of the “k” to be pronounced so that it could be broken out into a distinct looking app icon. 
    A few months back I got Paul McCartney’s new album “New” and the font had a very futuristic broken letter style I’ve been itching to riff off of. Since my client wanted something very modern, this seemed like the perfect opportunity to do just that. 
     Another element I had a lot of fun with was the broken circle around the “K.” Because the name is I Conquer but spelled with a “K” I thought it would be cool to have an element that hinted at the correct spelling.So, I attempted to do it in a way that would allow you to see them both at once while leaving the “C” subdued enough to serve more as a sort of an easter egg.

 

Here’s a logo with icon designs, I recently made for a client. The client wanted something very modern and iconic.

    He provided me with some sketches that gave me a ballpark for what he wanted for the “i” and the “k.” He wanted the design of the “k” to be pronounced so that it could be broken out into a distinct looking app icon. 

    A few months back I got Paul McCartney’s new album “New” and the font had a very futuristic broken letter style I’ve been itching to riff off of. Since my client wanted something very modern, this seemed like the perfect opportunity to do just that. 

     Another element I had a lot of fun with was the broken circle around the “K.” Because the name is I Conquer but spelled with a “K” I thought it would be cool to have an element that hinted at the correct spelling.So, I attempted to do it in a way that would allow you to see them both at once while leaving the “C” subdued enough to serve more as a sort of an easter egg.

 

Here’s a Beatles illustration I did using colored ink, watercolor, salt, and a digital gradient in the background. I’ve been digitally coloring my line art for a while now, but I’ve been meaning to break out my colored ink again for a while. The last time I used them was on my junior thesis in college. The other thing I did, was I used salt on the water colors in the background, a technique I haven’t used since I was in 7th grade.
    My goal with this was to try and use the different colors and textures to create depth and separate the planes of line art even though they are overlapping and threaded.
One big challenge I had with this is that the piece lost a lot of depth and atmosphere when I scanned it. I think the scanner made the whites and the inks much brighter and gave it a washed out look. I tried to bring it down in Photoshop but it never quite looked right and matched the life of the original. The solution I came up with was adding in that slight digital gradient background to bring back the depth.  

Here’s a Beatles illustration I did using colored ink, watercolor, salt, and a digital gradient in the background. I’ve been digitally coloring my line art for a while now, but I’ve been meaning to break out my colored ink again for a while. The last time I used them was on my junior thesis in college. The other thing I did, was I used salt on the water colors in the background, a technique I haven’t used since I was in 7th grade.

    My goal with this was to try and use the different colors and textures to create depth and separate the planes of line art even though they are overlapping and threaded.

One big challenge I had with this is that the piece lost a lot of depth and atmosphere when I scanned it. I think the scanner made the whites and the inks much brighter and gave it a washed out look. I tried to bring it down in Photoshop but it never quite looked right and matched the life of the original. The solution I came up with was adding in that slight digital gradient background to bring back the depth.  

Here’s a video I made about my experience with self publishing my children’s book The Bumbly Bears.

Andrew Garfield Plays The Spider-Man Theme

schoolofvisualarts:

Predators by Luther Mosher

SVA shared my illustration! 

schoolofvisualarts:

Predators by Luther Mosher

SVA shared my illustration! 

Here’s the finished art for the new song my band made.

This song tells the story of a woman named Margret who struggles with poverty and the one day of the year she can afford to live like everyone else is when she gets her tax refund.

My biggest influences are Ben Folds, Paul McCartney, and Pomplamoose, so if you’re into that kind of music you might like our meager attempt to channel those styles.

Here’s the finished art for the new song my band made.
This song tells the story of a woman named Margret who struggles with poverty and the one day of the year she can afford to live like everyone else is when she gets her tax refund.
My biggest influences are Ben Folds, Paul McCartney, and Pomplamoose, so if you’re into that kind of music you might like our meager attempt to channel those styles.
https://soundcloud.com/airgomusic-1/tax-return

Here’s the finished art for the new song my band made.

This song tells the story of a woman named Margret who struggles with poverty and the one day of the year she can afford to live like everyone else is when she gets her tax refund.

My biggest influences are Ben Folds, Paul McCartney, and Pomplamoose, so if you’re into that kind of music you might like our meager attempt to channel those styles.

https://soundcloud.com/airgomusic-1/tax-return

fuschiabloodz:

dawnrie-face:

allartnopay:

THIS.

YES.

REAL TALK

fuschiabloodz:

dawnrie-face:

allartnopay:

THIS.

YES.

REAL TALK