staff:

Happy National Voter Registration Day, Tumblr.
The number one way of celebrating it? Registering to vote.
Every year, millions of eligible Americans neglect to register, which means that millions of important voices are utterly silent on Election Day. Don’t be one of them. There’s basically a 100% chance that something you care about is on the ballot, something you don’t want to be quiet about.
So be one of the loud ones. Register already. It’s an easy form that you already know all the answers to. No excuses.

staff:

Happy National Voter Registration Day, Tumblr.

The number one way of celebrating it? Registering to vote.

Every year, millions of eligible Americans neglect to register, which means that millions of important voices are utterly silent on Election Day. Don’t be one of them. There’s basically a 100% chance that something you care about is on the ballot, something you don’t want to be quiet about.

So be one of the loud ones. Register already. It’s an easy form that you already know all the answers to. No excuses.

staff:

Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

Ready? 

Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

(Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Leonard Applebee (1914-2000) - Lobster, Oil on canvas, 33.7 x 50.3 cm. 1945.

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Leonard Applebee (1914-2000) - Lobster, Oil on canvas, 33.7 x 50.3 cm. 1945.

Here’s a poster I did for the progressive rock band Dream Window. 

cglmrfreeman:

embracingmyobsessivetraits:

(x)

Hitting so goddamn close to home right now.

Here’s a series of flyers I designed for my typography class. There were two focuses here. The first was to create distinct word marks for each event that in some way, literal or abstract conveyed the theme of the event. 
So I went about this in a relatively straight forward fashion. For architecture I tried to make the word have weight and presence. While designing it I had this sculpture from Astor place in mind.   
For film I used the obvious approach of repeated film stills like tons of people have already done. I tried to make it more interesting by making it a bit less figurative and making the backdrop of film serve as well as a fragmented continuation of the rhythm. Finally, I added the bottom triangular line to both make the over all image a more structural shape and link it to the architectural word mark, which was also part of the assignment. 
For music I wanted to use a music staff and have a line pattern to represent sound waves. I was worried about the staff being too boring and heavy handed, so I ended up taking that structural line from the previous two and repeated it to both tie it to the others and get across the staff idea.
The other big part of this project was to make sure we created a governing system or consistency in the use of visual elements. So, I used the same shapes more or less in all of these to create different compositions. Other rules were included such as, some shapes could only rotate on an axis, the body text was always sliding but attached outside the pink triangle, the event dates were always in the same basic location, the word marks had to be in the pink triangle, and my best attempt was made for the objects to slide around behaving as if governed by some sort of gravity. 
So yeah, that’s my unnecessarily long and possibly pretentious explanation for the process behind this project. 
P.S. We were required to work in only two pantone colors and explore what we could do between mixing and tinting them.

Here’s a series of flyers I designed for my typography class. There were two focuses here. The first was to create distinct word marks for each event that in some way, literal or abstract conveyed the theme of the event. 

So I went about this in a relatively straight forward fashion. For architecture I tried to make the word have weight and presence. While designing it I had this sculpture from Astor place in mind.   

For film I used the obvious approach of repeated film stills like tons of people have already done. I tried to make it more interesting by making it a bit less figurative and making the backdrop of film serve as well as a fragmented continuation of the rhythm. Finally, I added the bottom triangular line to both make the over all image a more structural shape and link it to the architectural word mark, which was also part of the assignment. 

For music I wanted to use a music staff and have a line pattern to represent sound waves. I was worried about the staff being too boring and heavy handed, so I ended up taking that structural line from the previous two and repeated it to both tie it to the others and get across the staff idea.

The other big part of this project was to make sure we created a governing system or consistency in the use of visual elements. So, I used the same shapes more or less in all of these to create different compositions. Other rules were included such as, some shapes could only rotate on an axis, the body text was always sliding but attached outside the pink triangle, the event dates were always in the same basic location, the word marks had to be in the pink triangle, and my best attempt was made for the objects to slide around behaving as if governed by some sort of gravity. 

So yeah, that’s my unnecessarily long and possibly pretentious explanation for the process behind this project. 

P.S. We were required to work in only two pantone colors and explore what we could do between mixing and tinting them.

Hey guys, here’s a super ridiculous song we recorded about how awesome our drummer Brad is. And here is an illustration I did for it.It’s written by Luke MosherRecorded by Justin MosherMixed by Luke and Justin MosherPiano, synth and Vocals Luke MosherBass: Justin MosherDrums and army of bats:(Bulletproof) Brad Corserhttps://soundcloud.com/airgomusic-1/bulletproof-brad

Hey guys, here’s a super ridiculous song we recorded about how awesome our drummer Brad is. And here is an illustration I did for it.

It’s written by Luke Mosher
Recorded by Justin Mosher
Mixed by Luke and Justin Mosher

Piano, synth and Vocals Luke Mosher
Bass: Justin Mosher
Drums and army of bats:(Bulletproof) Brad Corser

https://soundcloud.com/airgomusic-1/bulletproof-brad

This is a Poster I designed for my continuing education class at SVA.  I think green roofs are a pretty amazing way to help the environment while transforming the city in a beautiful way. So I was thrilled to have an excuse to make this. This is meant to be a large 20 by 30 inch poster, but I plan on making some alternate versions that are more web friendly interms or readability. I would be doing that with the hope that this actually gains some traffic to spread awareness about green roofing as a possibility. 
Here’s a link to a larger size. http://lmosher.deviantart.com/art/Green-Roofing-467037384

This is a Poster I designed for my continuing education class at SVA.  I think green roofs are a pretty amazing way to help the environment while transforming the city in a beautiful way. So I was thrilled to have an excuse to make this. This is meant to be a large 20 by 30 inch poster, but I plan on making some alternate versions that are more web friendly interms or readability. I would be doing that with the hope that this actually gains some traffic to spread awareness about green roofing as a possibility. 

Here’s a link to a larger size. http://lmosher.deviantart.com/art/Green-Roofing-467037384

brevoorthistoryofcomics:


X-Men #137 - September, 1980 More has probably been said and written about X-MEN #137 than virtually any other comic book of the period. And every word of it is true. More than any other single issue, this story made X-MEN the unrelenting sales juggernaut it continues to be to this day. It’s never been topped.  So what can I add to the reams of discussion? Well, I can tell you that I bought my copy in a local card store, which had become my primary source of new comics in the last year or so, since it was closer to my house than the 7-11, and got its books in better shape. I can tell you that I bought my copy along with my friend Israel Litwack, whom I’d turned onto X-Men just two months earlier. I can tell you that I read it in the far left corner of the couch in my family’s living room in the afternoon. And I can tell you that it was every bit as good is it’s reputed to be.  I don’t know if the X-Men fans of today can really appreciate this story, since so much that’s come since has in one way or another been because of it. (Not to mention the fact that this story was done back when the X-Men were still super heroes, as opposed to whatever the heck they are today.) The death of Jean Grey completely rewrote the rules about what could potentially happen in any Marvel Comic. And yes, I think it was a terrible mistake to have brought her back—but that’s water well under the bridge at this point.

brevoorthistoryofcomics:

X-Men #137 - September, 1980

More has probably been said and written about X-MEN #137 than virtually any other comic book of the period. And every word of it is true. More than any other single issue, this story made X-MEN the unrelenting sales juggernaut it continues to be to this day. It’s never been topped.

So what can I add to the reams of discussion? Well, I can tell you that I bought my copy in a local card store, which had become my primary source of new comics in the last year or so, since it was closer to my house than the 7-11, and got its books in better shape. I can tell you that I bought my copy along with my friend Israel Litwack, whom I’d turned onto X-Men just two months earlier. I can tell you that I read it in the far left corner of the couch in my family’s living room in the afternoon. And I can tell you that it was every bit as good is it’s reputed to be.

I don’t know if the X-Men fans of today can really appreciate this story, since so much that’s come since has in one way or another been because of it. (Not to mention the fact that this story was done back when the X-Men were still super heroes, as opposed to whatever the heck they are today.) The death of Jean Grey completely rewrote the rules about what could potentially happen in any Marvel Comic. And yes, I think it was a terrible mistake to have brought her back—but that’s water well under the bridge at this point.

Here’s a logo with icon designs, I recently made for a client. The client wanted something very modern and iconic.
    He provided me with some sketches that gave me a ballpark for what he wanted for the “i” and the “k.” He wanted the design of the “k” to be pronounced so that it could be broken out into a distinct looking app icon. 
    A few months back I got Paul McCartney’s new album “New” and the font had a very futuristic broken letter style I’ve been itching to riff off of. Since my client wanted something very modern, this seemed like the perfect opportunity to do just that. 
     Another element I had a lot of fun with was the broken circle around the “K.” Because the name is I Conquer but spelled with a “K” I thought it would be cool to have an element that hinted at the correct spelling.So, I attempted to do it in a way that would allow you to see them both at once while leaving the “C” subdued enough to serve more as a sort of an easter egg.

 

Here’s a logo with icon designs, I recently made for a client. The client wanted something very modern and iconic.

    He provided me with some sketches that gave me a ballpark for what he wanted for the “i” and the “k.” He wanted the design of the “k” to be pronounced so that it could be broken out into a distinct looking app icon. 

    A few months back I got Paul McCartney’s new album “New” and the font had a very futuristic broken letter style I’ve been itching to riff off of. Since my client wanted something very modern, this seemed like the perfect opportunity to do just that. 

     Another element I had a lot of fun with was the broken circle around the “K.” Because the name is I Conquer but spelled with a “K” I thought it would be cool to have an element that hinted at the correct spelling.So, I attempted to do it in a way that would allow you to see them both at once while leaving the “C” subdued enough to serve more as a sort of an easter egg.